CMS Updates PDPM Materials, Including Fresh FAQs.

In its latest guidance on the ongoing transition to the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM) set to occur Oct. 1, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has released a number of materials for stakeholders to review, including updates to its PDPM-related frequently asked questions (FAQs).

Read Patrick Connole’s timely article on this subject at www.providermagazine.com/news

To view this CMS update go to PDPM Fresh FAQS

CNE Announces New Program!

A new wound care program is now available through the University of Nebraska Medical Center.  UNMC’s College of Nursing, Continuing Nursing Education department (creators of Gero Nurse Prep) is proud to host the Wound Treatment Associate (WTA) program, developed by the WOCN Society using internationally-recognized leaders and educators in wound management and prevention, and augmented by our resident CWOCN expert.

The evidence based WTA program is a 12-week self-paced online program covering 14 wound care and prevention topics. Participants will have access to our Course Coordinator; an experienced and Certified Wound Ostomy Continence Nurse (CWOCN), throughout the program and during the one day, on-site group competency testing /simulation day, which provides an invaluable hands on training experience. On program completion, participants will receive 24.0 nursing contact hours and will also be prepared to take the WTA-C certification exam (not required).

The inaugural group is scheduled to start in February 2019 and space is limited. Registration closes February 1, 2019.

 

Please visit the website for more details https://app1.unmc.edu/cne/19wta001/.

CMS: 6 Steps Nursing Homes Can Take to Avoid Preventable Harm.

A new federal report delves into the first steps nursing home leaders can take to avoid preventable harm to their residents. This 60-page resource from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services was released late last year and created with the Quality Innovation Network National Coordinating Center.

The report also includes a two-page appendix with six strategies SNFs can pursue to get started.

  1. Shore Up Staffing.
  2. Know the residents and their needs and plan care with them.
  3. Prevent, identify, and address gaps in care.
  4. Promote excellent multidisciplinary team work.
  5. Provide tangible leadership engagement with staff and residents.
  6. Ensure excellent, competent, available, continuous care—onsite.

 

Gero Nurse Prep is still on sale – but not for much longer.

Save $100 off the regular registration fee now through November 30 by using promo code REALRN18 (all caps).  AHCA/NCAL Gero Nurse Prep provides tremendous value at this AHCA/NCAL member $590 sale price.   That’s less than $20 per contact hour for outstanding nursing education that makes a measurable difference on so many fronts.

Register now and lock in the discount – then take up to 60 days to pay. For details contact us at concne@unmc.edu

Voice Tech Has ‘A Long Way to Go’ to Meet the Hype in Skilled Nursing.

Voice technology has promise in senior care, but skilled nursing providers and residents need to keep their expectations tempered, one expert says.

When it comes to Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant, Elizabeth Mynatt, the executive director of Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology, has a note of caution.

“I think the Alexa is unproven,” Mynatt told Skilled Nursing News. “But there’s a lot of excitement about it, because it kind of takes away a lot of the complexity of text and computers, and you’re just talking to something. So there’s a lot of folks building what they call skills — essentially apps for things like the Alexa — but we have a long way to go.”

Read more at https://skillednursingnews.com/2018/07/voice-tech-long-way-go-meet-hype-skilled-nursing/

Are you prepared?

UNMC’s Brittany Nordby BSN, RN, EMT, shares her thoughts on how to be ready for disasters.

You are walking down the hallway doing your routine checks and you start to smell natural gas.  You are sitting at the nurses station charting and the power goes out.  You are in a tornado warning and you need to move your patients.  You answer the phone and get a bomb threat.

Do you know what to do? What does preparedness mean to you?  Do you feel prepared if a disaster were to hit your workplace or the community you work in?   Will you shelter-in-place or execute your facility’s evacuation plan?

Disasters come in all forms and can occur in an instant.  Biological, chemical, radiological, and natural disaster emergencies are all types of emergencies that can occur in the environment around us.  As nurses, we are the frontline providers to protect our patients in the event of a disaster.  We must ask ourselves if we have the skills and knowledge to effectively care for our patients during these tragic events.  Educating yourselves and your fellow nurses is the best way we can prepare for disasters that can occur in our workplaces and communities.

Planning, training, and exercising are all ways to assist in preparing for a disaster.  We must become familiar with our workplace disaster plan.  What do I do in the event of a fire, tornado, active shooter, flood, etc.?  Pull out that binder and make yourself familiar with the procedures that should be followed.  Recognize the vulnerable populations within your facility and the special considerations that may need to take place for those patients.  Participation in mass causality drills that may take place in your community, workplace, or even statewide is an excellent way to practice the plan you have educated yourself on.  Testing these plans allow us to see how well our original plan works and identifies any changes that need to be made.  Finally, exercising allows for communication and community connections you will need when a real disaster occurs.  Below you will find some helpful sites to visit.

https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/SurveyCertEmergPrep/Emergency-Prep-Rule.html

http://app1.unmc.edu/nursing/heroes/index.cfm

https://emergency.cdc.gov/

https://training.fema.gov/

It is never fun to think about a disaster occurring in your workplace or community.  Regardless of this fact, we must prepare ourselves in the event tragedy does strike.  Educate, plan, and utilize your resources to keep yourself and your patients safe and to provide the best care you can for your patients in the event of a disaster.


Brittany is the Project Coordinator for HEROES, which offers Emergency Preparedness training and education for healthcare providers and students across the state of Nebraska, and beyond. HEROES is an interdisciplinary approach to biological, chemical, radiological and natural disaster emergencies. Spearheaded by the UNMC College of Nursing, they collaborate with the College of Medicine, College of Allied Health Professions and the Center for Preparedness Education.

Respite needs expected to grow with aging population

Currently, there are 43 million adults in the United States who serve as a caregiver of an elderly parent or a family member with a disability or chronic condition. As the baby boomer generation continues to age, more people than ever will become caregivers, increasing the need for education and awareness of respite services. Find out more by going to:

https://www.unmc.edu/news.cfm?match=20602&pk_campaign=email&pk_kwd=Respite_needs_expected_to_grow_with_aging_population

Free ANCC Contact Hour – “SPIKES – A Six-Step Protocol for Delivering Bad News.”

It’s 9:00 AM and you are headed to your patient’s room where he and his family await news on the results of a recent test. Despite being optimistic, the outcome is not what anyone wanted. How prepared are you to communicate with your patient and his family on this? Would you like to be able to support the patient with empathy? Would you like to have the skills to develop a treatment plan at this critical moment?

FREE online training module “SPIKES – A Six-Step Protocol for Delivering Bad News” will provide you with the tools you need to enhance your confidence. Videos are provided that demonstrate the application of this protocol and you will also be able to see patient/family reaction when news is delivered in an insensitive manner versus using the protocol. This online resource is available 24/7 and provides 1.0 contact hour under ANCC criteria.

Improve your skills today! Sign up at: http://app1.unmc.edu/nursing/16CN098/index.cfm

The University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing Continuing Nursing Education is accredited with distinction as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.