Gero Nurse Prep is going to the AHCA/NCAL Convention.

Gero Nurse Prep prepares RNs for the ANCC Board Certification exam in gerontological nursing and increases geriatric nurse competency by 24% based on pre- and post-course test scores.  Visit with Dr. Heidi Keeler at booth 1724  to learn how Gero Nurse Prep can help strengthen your clinical performance and increase reimbursements.

 

National Falls Prevention Awareness Day

September 22, 2018, the first day of fall, marks the 10th annual National Falls Prevention Awareness Day, sponsored by the National Council on Aging (NCOA).

Falls are the leading cause of injury related emergency department visits for older adults, the major cause of hip fractures, and responsible for more than half of fatal head injuries. Numerous states and countries worldwide are now coalescing to address this growing public health issue; many are working closely with occupational therapy practitioners as key contributors to reducing falls.

This year’s theme, Take a Stand to Prevent Falls, seeks to unite professionals, older adults, caregivers, and family members to play a part in raising awareness and preventing falls in the older adult population. 48 states participated in Falls Prevention Awareness Day last year, joining more than 70 national organizations, including the American Occupational Therapy Association, other professional associations, and federal agencies that comprise the Falls Free© Initiative. If your organization participates in a falls prevention activity, please email fallsfree@ncoa.org to make sure you are counted by NCOA.

For a list of free resources, including the Falls Prevention Toolkit, go to

https://www.aota.org/fallsday

National Assisted Living Week Starts Sunday!

Capture the Moment” is this year’s theme for National Assisted Living Week, which hopes to inspire residents to realize their dreams and seize the day. Simultaneously, the theme also supports reflection, as residents may look back on the pivotal moments in their lives. With the theme’s word play referencing photography, residents may refer to pictures or videos from their past.
The theme also aims to remind assisted living staff that often the little, everyday interactions with residents can deliver high quality, person-centered care. Assisted living communities across the country are encouraged to organize activities and events during NALW that help residents celebrate their past while also enjoying the present. Find out more at:

What’s Next In Caring For Older People: The Age-Friendly Health System Movement

By Anna Chodos and William A. Haseltine

Our healthcare system needs to rethink how we care for older adults. Older adults have more complex needs than other populations, but they struggle to meet those needs within and across all care settings — from home to clinics to hospitals and long-term care facilities and back home again. Part of this is due to the medical and social complexity of older adults and their more frequent transitions, compared to other age groups, between healthcare settings.  Despite our current ecosystem of electronic health records and quality measurement, the often frustrating reality is that much of what is important to older people is rarely captured in the data, such as quality of life, function and goals.  One program alone will not fix this.

Enter the Age-Friendly Health System. Led by some of the best in aging and healthcare improvement, such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the John A Hartford Foundation, the Age-Friendly Health System is changing what it means to “age in America” with regard to healthcare.  The Age-Friendly Health System describes itself as a movement to recruit and support entire healthcare systems to focus on the domains most important to quality healthcare for older people.  These include the “4Ms”: mobility, medications, mentation, and what matters. This means making sure older people have a mobility plan when receiving medical care or in long term care; reviewing medications regularly to minimize harm; addressing conditions that affect thinking and are common in older people such as dementia, depression and delirium; and incorporating what matter to the person, such as their values, goals and preferences, into all care plans.

For the full article and references please go to:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamhaseltine/2018/08/21/whats-next-in-caring-for-older-people-the-age-friendly-health-system-movement/#fc298d157a44

Voice Tech Has ‘A Long Way to Go’ to Meet the Hype in Skilled Nursing.

Voice technology has promise in senior care, but skilled nursing providers and residents need to keep their expectations tempered, one expert says.

When it comes to Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant, Elizabeth Mynatt, the executive director of Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology, has a note of caution.

“I think the Alexa is unproven,” Mynatt told Skilled Nursing News. “But there’s a lot of excitement about it, because it kind of takes away a lot of the complexity of text and computers, and you’re just talking to something. So there’s a lot of folks building what they call skills — essentially apps for things like the Alexa — but we have a long way to go.”

Read more at https://skillednursingnews.com/2018/07/voice-tech-long-way-go-meet-hype-skilled-nursing/

Complimentary NPUAP Webinars.

On February 20, 2018 NPUAP offered a free webinar presented by Scott Matthew Bolhack, MD, MBA, CMD, CWS, FACP, FAAP and Janet Cuddigan, PhD, RN, CWCN, FAAN and moderated by Joyce A. Pittman, PhD, ANP-BC, FNP-BC, CWOCN.

Dr. Bolhack’s and Dr. Cuddigans’s webinar, titled Frequently Asked Questions About Pressure Injury Staging  is now available for viewing  on  the NPUAP website. Handouts and course information are  also available.

To access this and other complimentary webinars, go to http://www.npuap.org/resources/educational-and-clinical-resources/complimentary-educational-webinars/

Wearable rehabilitation technology awarded $1.6 million grant.

APDM Wearable Technologies has been awarded a National Institute on Aging SBIR Phase II grant totaling $1.6 million to commercialize a real-time biofeedback system. With this funding, APDM will develop the industry’s first over-ground gait biofeedback rehabilitation system utilizing both visual and auditory biofeedback so patients can rehabilitate in a real-world setting, according to a recent press release.

Existing technology like instrumented treadmills have an entry price of $80,000, restrict patients to straight walking at a fixed speed, and alter biomechanics in a way that does not translate back to daily activity. Not only will this novel biofeedback system be a fraction of the cost, but patients will be able to walk in diverse, real-world settings at a self-selected pace, which is crucial for re-training gait for sustained results.

Over 300 patients with various types of gait disturbances will be recruited for a clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the biofeedback system in a physical therapy clinic. Northwest Rehabilitation Associates will manage data collection throughout the clinical trial, Oregon Health & Science University’s (OHSU) Balance Disorder Lab will conduct scientific validation, and APDM will concentrate on technological development and analytics.

Read the full story in the press release.